Recombinant DNA



  • 0_1555993941692_IMG_20190423_100125411~2.jpg
    Ans of Q.106: d
    How can BAC main used for recombinant DNA of eukaryotes? How will introns be processed?

    In Q. 107 it is written—Eukaryotes possess introns which are absent in bacteria. That is why YAC is needed, which can process the introns.

    Then in Q.106, answer should be opt a. Why is answer opt d? Please explain.



  • @anag
    Bacteria become 'factories' that produce a large number of copies of the recombinant DNA. There are several reasons for the use of bacteria as the host in the recombinant DNA technology. They are; Bacterial cells are easy to grow, maintain, and manipulate in a laboratory.
    The key to tumor production is a large (200-kb) circular DNA plasmid—the Ti (tumor-inducing) plasmid. When the bacterium infects a plant cell, a part of the Ti plasmid—a region called T-DNA—is transferred and inserted, apparently more or less at random, into the genome of the host plant
    Similar to bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), yeast chromosomes can be used as host chromosomes in the process of DNA cloning Like BACs, YACs (yeast artificial chromosomes) are synthetic chromosomes with integrated DNA fragments from a foreign source. The difference between YACs and BACs is that YACs does not use a plasmid such as the F factor in E.Coli. Instead YACs use specific regions of the yeast chromosome



  • @sunitasaxena Thanks but my doubt is: " is it true that BAC is used for recombinant DNA of eukaryotes?" How will introns be processed?

    In Q. 107 it is written—Eukaryotes possess introns which are absent in bacteria. That is why YAC is needed, which can process the introns.

    Then in Q.106, answer should be opt a. Isn't it? Please explain.



  • @anag yes bac is used in recombinant DNA in eukaryotes
    The techniques for gene manipulation, cloning, and expression were first developed in bacteria but are now applied routinely in a variety of model eukaryotes. The genomes of eukaryotes are larger and more complex than those of bacteria, so modifications of the techniques are needed to handle the larger amounts of DNA and the array of different cells and life cycles of eukaryotes. For instance, some eukaryotic proteins cannot be easily expressed in large amounts in bacteria, and eukaryotic expression systems need to be employed. A widely used vector–expression system for eukaryotic proteins is insect baculovirus, into which genes are inserted and expressed at high rates in cultured insect cells, Although eukaryotic genes are cloned and sequenced in bacterial hosts, it is often desirable to introduce such genes back into the original eukaryotic host or into another eukaryote — in other words, to make a transgenic eukaryote.


Log in to reply
 

Powered by dubbtr | @2019

Looks like your connection to dubbtr was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.